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Simples

I can’t pretend I’m not frustrated with the software community for its limited engagement with the question of organisational performance. Given that organisational performance is inextricably linked with the quality of life of folks working in software and IT departments everywhere, and with the health of society more broadly too. This post explores the (simple) connection between organisational performance and Organisational Psychotherapy.

Organisational Performance

I’m using the term “performance” here more broadly than might be regarded as common (but consistent with e.g. the Wikipedia entry).

Aside: In the vocabulary of the Antimatter Principle, we define organisational performance (somewhat opaquely, to be sure) as:

“The relative impact on all the needs of all The Folks That Matter™, of meeting all the needs of all The Folks That Matter™”

For the purposes of this post, I’m using the term to cover:

  • Financial performance (profits, revenues, return on assets, return on investment, debt ratio, etc.)
  • Shareholder value (total shareholder return, economic value added, share price, etc.)
  • Sales and market share
  • Customer and supplier (including employee and management) satisfaction
  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • The well-being of the Core Group (probably the most crucial, yet least openly discussed)

The Proposition

Organisational Psychotherapy is a very simple proposition, really. Let’s lay it out and see who agrees or disagrees with the line of reasoning at any point:

  1. The assumptions and beliefs held in common (i.e. collectively) within an organisation drive every aspect of the behaviours of that organisation.
  2. The behaviours of an organisation, in toto, govern the performance of that organisation.
  3. To increase the performance of an organisation in any or all of the dimensions of organisational performance requires some changes in its behaviour.*
  4. Any and all changes in behaviour come from changes in the collective assumptions and beliefs held by the organisation.
  5. Organisations rarely have the competence (skills) to examine, change their collective assumptions and beliefs
  6. Outside intervention (i.e. the Organisational Psychotherapist) can help kick-start the organisation in its internal dialogue, introspection and acquisition of the skills necessary to examine and change its collective assumptions and beliefs.

*Note: Excluding considerations of external factors beyond the control of the organisation.

Put another way, Organisational Psychotherapy reduces the risks, costs and timescales of an organisation changing its collective assumptions and beliefs, and thereby reduces the risks, costs and timescales of improving the performance of the organisation.

Diagrammed

Here’s a diagram illustrating the above line of reasoning:

Graphic representation of the line of reasoning

 

Further Reading

Who Really Matters: The Core Group Theory of Power, Privilege, and Success ~ Art Kleiner
The Five Capitals – a framework for sustainability ~ Forum For the Future article
Productivity ~ Think Different blog post

Structurally Broken

“When you have a system in which structural failure is embedded, nothing short of structural change will significantly improve it.”

~ George Monbiot

He was talking about the UK’s transport infrastructure, but I’ve long believed the world’s “Software Industry” system is structurally broken, too. Even the very name “software industry” signals dysfunction. (Of course, this observation applies to many industries, not just software).

Software

“The great Harvard marketing professor Theodore Levitt used to tell his students, “People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole!” Every marketer we know agrees with Levitt’s insight. Yet these same people segment their markets by type of drill and by price point; they measure market share of drills, not holes; and they benchmark the features and functions of their drill, not their hole, against those of rivals.”

~ Clayton M. Christensen

We’ve heard time and again that people (customers, the general public) don’t want software, they want the utility that software can bring. Yet we call our industry the software industry, condemning us to build and deliver stuff that our customers don’t want. Granted, “that cat’s outa da bag” as Lt Columbo would say. Renaming the whole industry as something like “the pain solving industry” or the “attending to folks’ needs” industry ain’t going to happen any time soon, if ever.

Industry

Why do we describe the <name to be argued over> field as an “industry” anyways? Images of factories and satanic mills and slave plantations and the Apple “1984” advertisement come to mind. “Art” is rarely labelled as an industry, for example.

Structural Change

So what kind of structural change or changes might bring about some improvements?

#NoSoftware points the way. Analogous to the Paris 15-minute city idea (by implication, #NoCars).

And until customers stop asking for drills (software) and begin explicitly asking for holes (their needs met) we’ll likely not see much change.

What kind of structural changes can you envisage, suggest?

– Bob

Further Reading

Beyond Command And Control – A Book Review ~ Think Different blog post

 

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